Common FAQ

Thursday, May 2, 2019

FAQ’S

  1. As I am entering the later years in life, I want to make sure I am not placing any undue burden on my family if I need care or help managing my life. What is the best way to go about putting all my information in order?

Answer

This is a great question, and one that gets asked often. In order to have your family know what your plans are for the future, you need a plan and a place where the information can be easily located. CoachSmart Consulting, LLC has developed a “Personal Care Guidebook” that can be purchased on our website: Coachsmartconsulting.com. In this guidebook there are worksheets for your personal, legal, financial, and medical information to enable you to organize your information and future care plans. By completing this, you lesson the burden for you and your family should you unexpectantly become ill or incapacitated.


  1. I have noticed that my sister is struggling with managing her finances. She has asked me to help her. What do I need to do if I want to manage paying her bills?

Answer:

The best advice for legal matters can be obtained from a lawyer or fiduciary. However, some basic information for your situation is to know what you need so you can get your sister’s information from any financial institution that she is using. There are two approaches, a power of attorney or become a court appointed guardian and conservator. If your sister is just needing you to help with her finances and continues to manage the rest of her life OK, then your sister can designate you as her power of attorney with a notarized power of attorney form—this is a much easier process. The power of attorney paperwork forms can be obtained from a lawyer for a fee, the forms are signed and notarized. In addition, you can get power of attorney paperwork forms on-line for most states and they are can be free or charge a small fee. Simply, follow the instructions with the form and get the necessary signatures notarized—there is usually a notary at your local bank. If your sister is more incapacitated in managing her affairs, you would then have to be appointed by the courts as her guardian and conservator with the proper proof of her condition by her doctors. It will be necessary to contact a lawyer who specializes in guardian and conservatorships so you can start that court process. If you have any additional questions regarding this process, a lawyer is the best person to provide that advice.


  1. I live in California and my parents are aging. How can I provide more assistance to them when I live so far away?

Answer:

The first steps are putting together a future personal care plan. Information to know about are the personal, legal, medical, financial and future care needs for your parents. Every individual is different when it comes to their information and the care they need or will need on a day-to-day basis. I start by making available to individuals a “Personal Care Guidebook” which contains worksheets, as well as national support organizations for the disabled and elderly to help with current or future needs. In addition, our business offers consulting and coaching to help you know where to begin, helping you understand how to set up on-line payments and access to their information. Access our guidebook on our website at: Coachsmartconsulting.com


  1. I am helping a family member who is aging. Is it possible to have them continue to live in their home?

Answer:

An individual can continue to live in their home provided they are safe and can do it without harming themselves or someone else. Personally, our family was not able to keep my father at home as his health needs were more than my mother or siblings were able to manage. We were able to place him in a local nursing home where my sisters worked, which allowed him to see family regularly. My mother had a different choice and stayed in her home with some in-home care assistance for bathing, cleaning and getting groceries. These decisions depend on the specific physical and medical needs of the individual. If more serious medical needs are needed, a residential facility may best serve them as they provide medically trained staff to deal with medical issues. In addition, an important component is continuing to provide a social network of friends for the individual regardless of where they may live. Sometimes the best place for a family member to be is in an assisted living facility as it provides more social interaction, without having to leave the facility.


  1. My son has a disability and needs continued care and someone to advocate for him. What can I do to be better prepared should anything happen to my husband or I? Where do I start?

Answer:

First, you will need to have his specific information in order so another person can continue caring for his needs in much the same manner that your husband and you have done. Check out the “Personal Care Guidebook” on our website at: Coachsmartconsulting.com. Caring for another adult individual is no easy task, is challenging and can become more difficult as they age. An emotional and hard decision for many parents is placing their child in a residential facility or setting up a private apartment or home with care providers. We can support and coach you through that process as prior placement allows you to support your son with this transition and allows you to be an advocate for the type of care he needs. It will also help your son develop his own social network of friends. Lastly, prior placement and organizing his information will take the burden off other family members who may not be as familiar with your sons needs as your husband and you.


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